Delicious and Nutritious Trout Recipes

In getting back into my routine after a month of celebrations, I have been trying to focus on eating more lean protein and vegetables. I love salmon and I recently discovered salmon’s less expensive but equally delicious and nutritious cousin, steelhead trout. The taste is very similar and so are the nutritional facts.

In the recipe below, I will show you how I cooked Canadian Steelhead Trout. This particular fish is the farm-raised* variety, purchased at BJ’s wholesale for $7.99/lb. The cut you see pictured is 1.3 lbs and serves 4.

Uncooked Steelhead Trout

*Though farm-raised salmon has a bad reputation, trout available on the US market is primarily farm-raised, and trout farming is subject to strict environmental standards. Available wild caught trout are actually more questionable. Farmed North American rainbow trout is considered a “best choice” by the Seafood Watch and the Environmental Defense Fund. Read more about the benefits of steelhead trout and the regulations in the US and Canada.

So, for a quick and easy dinner after work, I drizzled this trout with extra virgin olive oil and lemon juice, sprinkled it with garlic powder and rosemary, and cooked it uncovered in the oven at 375 degrees F for about 20 minutes. I don’t strictly time or measure; instead I go based on how it looks.

Uncooked trout dressed in olive oil and rosemary ready to go in the oven

And voila:

Cooked Steelhead Trout

The first time I ate it I made a pea and zucchini noodle side dish to go with it. Final product pictured below. And yes, I did have a small slice of bread to go with it.

Trout with peas and zucchini on the side

I have to perfect the recipe to this side dish before I share it with you all. These were the ingredients:

Ingredients for my zucchini noodles with peas in greek-yogurt sauce

The next time I made the trout I was tired after a long day and I wanted to go for easy sides. I ate it with steam-in-the-bag cauliflower rice and steam-in-the-bag vegetables tossed in olive oil with a dash of black pepper. I also added sliced almonds to the cauliflower rice for a nice crunch.

Steamed veggies and cauliflower rice

I then used the leftover trout to make a brunch omelette with liquid eggs (the kind where the fat from the yolks has been removed).

The start of the omelette prior to adding trout and red peppers
Trout and liquid eggs omelette

One of my goals at this stage of my life (residency) is eating well on a budget and eating food that is easy and not overwhelming to make when I am tired and hungry. However, some may object to the fact that liquid eggs are processed. Some may point out that yolks do carry many nutrients. Another option is to use real eggs but only use one yolk. Separate the egg yolks yourself and use one yolk for every 4 egg whites. This way you get some of the benefits of the yolk without all of the saturated fat.

I am a big fan of unsaturated fat, especially polyunsaturated fat found in olive oil, but I try to avoid excess saturated fat given my cholesterol levels and my family history. Given the obesity epidemic in America, I also try to limit sugar in my diet. I do not avoid carbohydrates altogether but I make an effort to emphasize the whole food sources of carbohydrates, such as from fruits and vegetables, and foods that are rich in fiber. However, I also believe in everything in moderation, including moderation.

I hope you enjoyed learning about how to incorporate this delicious, nutritious, and economical fish into your diet in simple, quick, and easy ways!