Medicine Simply Author

My Winter Skincare Routine

Is winter starting to make your skin dry and your lips chapped? Below is my winter skincare regimen as well as tips for keeping your skin glowing all year long.

The first tool I find extremely versatile is Aquaphor. It is an ointment made of 41% petrolatum that serves as a semi-occlusive barrier on the skin. This keeps water and oxygen from being pulled from the skin by the elements, which helps with wound healing and creates a protective moist environment. It does not contain fragrances, preservatives, or dyes so it is good for even the most sensitive skin. It is non-comedogenic so it won’t clog up your pores. I use it on my face, my lips, my hands, and any other dry areas in the evening.

Vaseline is also made of petrolatum but it is 100% petrolatum, so it forms an occlusive barrier and is a lot thicker and stickier.

Some people prefer moisturizing with a cream or lotion rather than an ointment. The difference is that an ointment contains around 80-100% oil and up to 20% water, so an ointment feels oily on your skin and doesn’t “rub in.” A cream, on the other hand, is about 50% oil and 50% water so you will still have an oily layer that doesn’t fully rub in but it is less greasy. Make note, however, that creams often contain emulsifiers and preservatives which can be irritating to the skin. A lotion is similar to a cream but it is an even lighter or less thick formulation and can sometimes contain alcohols for faster drying. Gels and foams are the lightest, so to speak, and they also dry faster the the aid of alcohols. One cream that I find to be non-irritating to my skin and a great moisturizer is Cetaphil Cream. Some providers recommend CeraVe Moisturizing Cream but when I have tried it myself a felt a stinging sensation on my skin, body and face.

Another part of my skincare regimen that I use at night is Differin Adapalene Gel 0.1%. I had mild acne in college and used adapalene (Differin) gel, which at that time required a prescription (now it is over-the-counter!), along with an antibiotic cream called clindamycin. Differin is a topical retinoid that increases skin turnover and wards away acne including blackheads and whiteheads. Retinoids are also anti-aging (you may have heard of prescription Retin-A). I still use a pea-size amount of Differin gel about once every 3-4 nights to maintain clear skin. However, retinoids can be very drying so be sure to moisturize aggressively. Also, wait at least 30 minutes after applying Differin to apply moisturizer as you want to avoid getting retinoid on the sensitive skin around the eyes.

In the morning, I use a tinted CC cream that contains SPF 50. I am currently using IT cosmetics’ Your Skin but Better CC Cream with SPF 50 Plus (Medium) – 1.08 Ounces. I really like the way it gives me a smooth, even skin tone without feeling heavy at all. I use this in the morning with some Aquaphor on my lips. I even use it at night as my foundation and then use a contour stick over it plus mascara, lipstick, and bronzer or blush. I love the fact that it includes SPF for daytime. Protecting my skin from UVA and UVB rays is a priority in order to prevent skin cancer as well as aging and discoloration (and yes, you do need SPF in the winter time too! You can get your Vitamin D from food or a supplement). I will admit, on rotations where I have to wake up at the crack of dawn, I often roll out of bed, brush my teeth, throw on scrubs, and go to work bare-faced, as evidenced in this photo from my intern year.

However, lately I have been making an effort to effort to wear SPF, and to look a little more polished. Also to floss my teeth nightly, but that’s a story for another day.

Lastly, I am a lifelong user of Dove soap. It is the only soap that does not dry out my skin. Because I use Dove I do not have to regularly moisturize my body skin.

And that sums it up. I like to keep my skincare regimen simple and effective. Moisturize at night, preferably with ointment or a non-irritating cream, and wear SPF in the morning.

Hand Washing

How To Avoid Cold and Flu

The winter chill is in the air and everyone around you is sneezing. What can you do to steer clear of cold and flu viruses this season?

Hand Washing
Prevent illness by washing hands frequently!

The best medicine is prevention.

The first step is to avoid getting sick in the first place. Here are my tips:

  • Wash and sanitize your hands frequently. This is the best way to avoid getting sick. In the hospital there are Purell dispensers in front of every patient room and sinks easily accessible. I sanitize my hands before and after every patient encounter. I also wash my hands before eating or before touching my face. I carry hand sanitizer in my purse and in my car.
  • In fact, I avoid putting my hands near my face unless freshly washed. (This is no easy task for a former nail biter!)
  • Avoid people who are sick, especially if you are immunocompromised. If you must come in to close contact with someone who is sick (e.g. your child), wash your hands after any contact with them and before eating or putting your hands near your face. Consider wearing a mask.
    • If you are in close contact with someone with documented influenza, discuss with your PCP whether you should take prophylactic oseltamivir (Tamiflu) medication.
  • GET YOUR INFLUENZA VACCINE! Everyone. Even if you have never had the flu. Even if you are otherwise healthy. I cannot stress this enough to my patients. The influenza vaccine saves lives. Some myth busting:
    • You cannot get influenza from the injected influenza vaccine. You may develop a day or two of malaise and even a low-grade fever as your body creates antibodies to the vaccine. However, you cannot develop influenza.
    • Vaccines do NOT cause autism. More on this in a later post, but read this for more.
    • The vaccine is not 100% effective (nothing is in medicine). However, it significantly reduces the incidence of influenza.
    • See the CDC website for more.
  • Get your pneumococcal (“pneumonia”) vaccine if you meet criteria (eg. if you are above the age of 65 or if you smoke, have diabetes, or a variety of other chronic illnesses). This will help protect you from one of the common causes of bacterial pneumonia. Discuss with your PCP.

But why should I care about avoiding getting a respiratory infection in the first place?

  • According to the CDC, about 36,000 people die of influenza each year.
    • In my ICU rotation my intern year, I took care of an otherwise healthy 45 year old man who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome from the flu and was on a ventilator for 5 weeks.
    • I personally got the H1N1 flu in 2009 and, though I was otherwise perfectly healthy at the time, I was completely out of commission with a high fever for 11 days. This was followed by another week of so of pneumonia and a pleural effusion. The flu is no joke!
  • It’s bad for the economy. No, seriously. According to the CDC, influenza alone causes workers in the US to lose up to 111 million workdays, totaling to an estimated $7 billion per year in sick days and lost productivity.
  • Even a simple “cold” (a viral upper respiratory infection) can be fatal for people with chronic conditions such as asthma and COPD, people who are immunosuppressed (eg. people with cancer on chemotherapy, people with autoimmune disorders on immunosuppressing medications, people with HIV/AIDS).
  • You can pass it on to other people, including people with the above conditions.
  • It’s a hassle! Whether you are the one who is sick or your child, spouse, or loved one is, respiratory infections are a nuisance.

I’ve caught a cold (or flu)! Now what?

  • If you have a fever (temp > 100.5F), consider getting tested for influenza with your PCP or at an urgent care center, as you may qualify for receiving oseltamivir (Tamiflu). You must present within 48hr of symptoms to have any benefit from Tamiflu. This medication can reduce symptoms and shorten duration of illness by 1-2 days.
  • If you have fever and cough productive of sputum (of any color), or symptoms that do not get better within a week, seek medical examination as you could have a lower respiratory infection such as pneumonia.
  • For all other viral upper respiratory infections (symptoms such as sore throat, runny or stuffed nose, runny eyes, sneezing), no medication is needed. You may take supportive medications (i.e., medications to make you feel better). Your body will fight the virus on it’s own.
  • Get rest, drink plenty of fluids, and avoid close contact with other people in order to prevent passing the virus on.
  • If you have malaise, muscle aches, headache, or fever, ibuprofen (the active ingredient in Advil and Motrin) and/or Acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) can help relieve those symptoms.
    • Discuss with your doctor whether these medications are safe for you. For example, those with kidney problems and those at increased risk of bleeding should not take ibuprofen without OK from your doctor. Those with liver problems should check with doctor before taking acetaminophen.
    • Seek medical care if you have a severe headache, especially if you do not typically have headaches or if it is the worst headache of your life.
  • If you have a stuffy or runny nose, consider saline nasal spray or using a Neti Pot. Decongestants such as DayQuil can help (contains 3 ingredients: acetaminophen, a cough suppressant, and a nasal decongestant) though I personally never use these myself. Ask your doctor before using decongestants (ingredients such as phenylephrine) especially if you are prone to a racing heart, high blood pressure, or glaucoma.
  • If you primarily have phlegm and a productive cough, you may benefit from a cough suppressant such as Mucinex (tablets) or Robitussin (liquid). I order them frequently in hospitalized patients.

Using these tips I have avoided getting sick so far this season (knocking on wood!). Stay healthy and be well!

See my About page for all disclaimers.

Benign Skin Growths and Spots

During my dermatology elective, I encountered countless patients who were concerned about growths on their skin that were, in fact, harmless and very common. There are thousands of lesions that can appear on the skin, but here I will discuss a few of of the most commonly seen benign skin spots and growths. I will also discuss what kind of changes to be cautious of when examining growths and moles. When in doubt, consult with your dermatologist.

Brown Spots

1.freckles-boy-flickr-NoSpareTime Freckles (“Ephelides”): these small, flat light-brown spots are small, multiple, and irregularly shaped. They appear in childhood, darken during the summer months, and lighten during the winter months (waxing and waning in response to sun exposure). They are due to a local, superficial accumulation of melanin, the protein the gives pigment to our skin and protects us from the sun. They are more common in lighter-skinned individuals who sunburn more easily. Sometimes these fade with age. The best way to avoid new freckles is by good sunprotection.

2. “Solar lentigos” (aka liver spots, age spots, or sun spots): these brown spots appear similar to freckles, but have sharper margins and sometimes stand alone. They can be found on the backs of hands, the shoulders, and the head and neck of adults. They are caused by sun damage acquired over time, but their appearance is persistent (they do not darken or lighten with the sun, or with time). They are due not only to a local accumulation of melanin, but also to a local increase in the cells that produce melanin (“melanocytes”). Some consider them to be flat versions of seborrheic keratoses (see below). Though not harmful, they can be treated for cosmetic reasons with freezing (“cryosurgery”), chemical peels, or certain lasers.

solar lentigos facesolarLentigo_53672_lg

3. Café-au-lait spots: these light-brown “macules” (flat, smaller than 0.5cm) and “patches” (flat, greater than 0.5cm) appear within the first year of life. They are due to a local increase in melanin. If a child has greater than 5 café-au-lait spots >1.5cm, they should be tested for syndromes such as neurofibromatosis.

cafe au lait infantcafe au lait

3. Junctional nevi: these darker brown, sharply bordered, flat lesions are a type of mole (“nevi” = mole). Moles have specific features under the microscope. They do not need to be removed unless there are features concerning for melanoma (see the ABCDE rules below). Removal is by cutting them out (“excision”); be mindful that excisions leave scars.

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*There are many types of flat and elevated moles. Some have more pigment, and some are skin-colored. We will discuss at the end how to monitor moles.

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Signs of Wisdom – seen more commonly in people age 30+

1. Seborrheic Keratoses (SKs): sometimes referred to as barnacles, these light tan to dark brown waxy growths appear to be “stuck on” to the skin, as if they could be peeled off with your fingernail. They have a rough, warty surface, and they can grow up to 1” (2.5cm) in width. SKs are caused by skin cells from the top layer of the epidermis (“keratinocytes” in the “stratum corneum”) sticking together. Some think they may be related to sun exposure. There is no need to remove these growths, as they are completely harmless, but if they become irritated or cosmetically undesirable, they can be removed by freezing (“cryotherapy”), burning with an electric current (“electrocautery”), or scraping.

seb kerseborrheic_keratoses_2_high

2. Skin Tags: these smooth, fleshy growths hang on to the skin by a little stalk. These are commonly acquired in areas of friction. Though they are harmless, if irritated or undesired they can be removed by snipping with scissors or freezing.

skin tag neckskin-tags-polyps-33

3. Cherry angiomas: the cherry-red raised round bumps (“papules”). They often start out flat and become dome-shaped. They are caused by an abnormal growth within capillaries, the smallest blood vessels. In the rare case that the patient desires removal, they can be burned off with electrocautery or zapped with a laser.

cherriescherry angiomas

Monitoring moles and other growths and spots:

One of the most important rules of thumb in screening for melanoma is the ugly duckling sign: spotting the mole or growth that does not look like the others. A lesion is often not concerning if you have others that look like it on your body.

Monitor your moles by following the ABCDEs. The most important of these is E – EVOLVING—if you notice any change in your moles, or any appearance of new moles, mention this to your dermatologist during your check-up. [*Make note that even benign moles can grow. Not all change is melanoma.]

A – ASYMMETRY: if your mole has become uneven or asymmetric, have it looked it.
B – BORDER: benign moles have nice, regular borders. Dangerous moles have irregular borders.
C – COLOR: benign moles usually have only one color. Dangerous moles can have two or more.
D – DIAMETER: benign moles are usually smaller than a pencil eraser (<6mm).
E – EVOLVING: changes in your moles or the appearance of new moles should prompt examination.

ABCDEs-1

HPV: Could It Happen To You?

This article was originally published by The Cornell Daily Sun on February 14, 2014. Some changes have been made to this version.

A 25 year-old woman comes to clinic for her routine Papanicolau (Pap) smear during my ob-gyn rotation. A few days later she receives a phone call from the gynecology resident. “Your Pap smear results were abnormal,” the doctor told her, “and we would like to take a biopsy of your cervix, which we do under an exam called a colposcopy.” She is told that this abnormality was caused by a strain of the human papillomavirus (HPV), the same virus family that causes common warts.

“HPV?” she asks, “isn’t that a sexually transmitted infection?”

“It is, in fact it is the most common STI in the US.”

“I didn’t think that I was at risk for HPV… I have not had many partners… and we almost always use protection… and I think maybe I was vaccinated… Does this mean I’m going to get cancer?”

The patient expressed a flurry of questions. She was quite surprised and distressed. She did not know that she could be among the 20 million Americans, male and female, aged 15-49 currently infected with HPV. Seventy-four percent of those infections occur in the 15-24 age group.

Nearly all sexually active people will become infected with one of the many strains of HPV at some point in their lives; half become infected within three years of becoming sexually active. Some strains are high-risk, or potentially cancer-causing, and some are low-risk, or wart-causing. Most HPV infections will not cause symptoms or problems, and they will become undetectable within 6-24 months. Among women with high-risk HPV infection of the cervix, the infection will be persistent in 10%, putting the patient at risk of developing dysplasia, or precancer, that, if left untreated, could progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is currently the third most common cancer in women, and 99.7% of cervical cancer is caused by HPV. Both males and females, regardless of sexual orientation, are susceptible to developing dysplasias and cancers of the anogenital region. HPV has also been associated with head and neck cancers and some skin cancers. Looking at cancer as a whole, approximately 5% of all cancers in men and 10% of all cancers in women are caused by HPV.

There is no cure for HPV infection. The best strategies are prevention and early detection. Vaccination with Gardasil or Cervarix can prevent infection with HPV types 16 and 18, which are responsible for 70% of cervical cancer. Gardasil also provides protection against HPV types 6 and 11 which cause anogenital warts. Gardasil has been approved for use in both females and males ages 9 to 26, and is ideally given before the start of sexual activity (i.e. before exposure to HPV), so it is commonly administered prepubertally (eg. age 11-12). Even if you are already sexually active, vaccination is recommended. On the other hand, even if you plan to abstain and become monogamous for life, if your partner has ever had another sexual partner, you could still be at risk for acquiring HPV. Furthermore, HPV can be transmitted by genital contact besides intercourse. Vaccination should be a consideration for all young people, because everyone who will eventually become sexually active will most likely be exposed to at least one strain of this ubiquitous virus.

Because vaccination does not cover all strains of HPV, regular Pap smears are recommended in women aged 21 and over regardless of vaccination status. With a Pap smear your doctor can collect a sample of cells from the cervix and upper vagina to analyze under the microscope. This test can detect precancerous cells, prompting further intervention in order to diagnose dysplasia and prevent the progression to cancer.

So, what are some ways to protect yourself against HPV?

1. Get vaccinated if you are under 26, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and sexual activity. Then,

2. Get Pap smears regularly if you are a female, starting at age 21. Your doctor will let you know how frequently you should be screened. Currently most women with a negative Pap smear at age 21 only need screening once every three years.

3. Use condoms consistently. Condom use reduces the risk of HPV infection and disease progression. Condoms are not, however, a perfect protection against HPV. Condom use is important to prevent against other STIs including HIV and chlamydia, two infections that have serious consequences in their own right, and that make HPV more likely to remain persistent.

4. Consider your number of partners: HPV prevalence increases nearly linearly with increasing number of lifetime partners, despite condom use. Furthermore, infection with multiple high-risk HPV types increases the risk of high-grade precancerous lesions.

5. Don’t smoke: Smoking is a risk factor for persistent infections.

If, after taking appropriate precautions, you find yourself with an HPV-related concern as the patient described did, remember that:

1) You are not alone. The volume of patients seeking care for HPV-related concerns, particularly cervical dysplasia, is quite large. On my ob-gyn rotation, four afternoons per week were dedicated to cervical dysplasia: one to Pap smears and three to colposcopy. I have also seen patients presenting to dermatology for genital warts and for HPV-related skin cancers and precancers of the penis.

2) About 90% of infections become undetectable without further intervention. Therefore, your infection will most likely not remain persistent, and you will most likely not develop an HPV-related cancer. Make healthy choices for your body and mind, and live your life.

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